Atlantic ocean

18 January 2019

After a tiring two days, including a twelve-hour chicken bus ride trip from Kaapschehoop to Richards Bay Jacques welcomed me with dinner, together with an introduction to the French radio playing in the background.

Which, I learned soon enough, would be ever playing. In soft tones and melodies that transcript the ages’ harmonies. With very limited understanding of french, I would soon practise mocking the words of the hosts.

Soon two couples from neighbouring boats joined us onboard for a night. I had the pleasure of meeting Jana and Martin who lived on Per Linde as well as Damien and Delfina from NEANT. They shared their stories of sailing and discovery and with Beethoven’s Juilliard String Quartet we started exploring the music of the ages; from classical harmonies, rock and roll and even some French rap songs.

It goes without saying, “Qui n’avance pas, recule.” certainly does not apply to these beautiful people. No, they leap into adventure with heart and soul! To be able to share a fraction of our journeys with one another is a gift I will cherish evermore. They taught me, once more, to see with new eyes and listen with childlike curiosity.

St. Lucia Day-tripping

20 January 2019

Rio dos Médãos do Ouro — River of the Gold Dunes is what captain Fernão de Álvares Cabra men christened St. Lucia soon after their ship wrecked on the Transkei coast. On 13 December 1575, the day of the feast of Saint Lucy, Manuel Peresterello renamed the mouth area to Santa Lucia. In the mouth of the Tugela tourists gather to witness the hippos that roam the waters of the Tugela mouth.

We followed the KwaZulu-Natal’s forestry crossroads, with craters that threw the car from one side to the other. After two hours of holding fast to our seats and a disappointing halt at a so-called cheese farm, we search for some place to quench our thirst and silence our rumbling stomachs.

With ancient astoundment I stare at the dunes that stretch as far right and as far left as the naked eye allows one to see. It is by no chance that this coastline is often referred to as the Wild Coast!

Tell tales

21 – 25 January 2019

The day’s fieriness had us glowing, threatening to slow the motion of the day. Albeit! A braai had been hosted by Zululand yacht club, where one meets with the subtle idiosyncrasies of culture, language and tell tales of the seas.

Will we ever exhaust our need for exploring the dimensions of our understanding? For the ocean promises neither to return one safely to shore, nor not to swallow one to the very depths of this earth.

While the fires grew dim, voices arose and stories unfolded. Stories of wonder, of discovery that in its own turn had sparked – in each – a yearning desire to follow the winds and the tides to shores unknown. Sommige laat klink selfs, verlangende verhalle van voëlvrye vaart en gee erkenning aan hul verslawing aan daardie diep donker blou.

With everything prepared for the journey to Cape Town, we ready the last few things before departure. Die heersende atmosfeer vertolk spanende opwinding. For some, these docks had been home for over a month. Five boats had sailed from Richards Bay that late morning, heading to Cape Town.

Port Elizabeth to Cape Town

28 – 31 January 2019

In the mid hours of the morning we arrive in Port Elizabeth. Algoa Bay, meaning “to Goa” in Portuguese has a longstanding history, tracing back to 1488 when Bartolomeu Dias erected a cross on Kwaaihoek, followed by Vasco de Gama and later the British settlers in 1820.

The port is powdered in manganese dust and home to many fishing boats. In the early hours of the morning the fishermen would depart with swaying bright lights and chattering murmur growing more distant as their lights fade from sight. At a family owned restaurant, This Is Eat, we delight in curry fish and refresh with a cool ice cream.

We depart from Port Elizabeth towards Cape Town. With little wind we had to travel under motor from Cape of good hope and arrive in Hout Bay harbour. A pod of dolphins lead us into the channel, with gently swift movements they dance in the wake and in the streamline of the bow as they so often do. We have the pleasure of meeting some South African folk living on various vessels. They welcome us for drinks aboard and the stories and tell tales continue.

Many more words can be written about the sail I’ve had on Enjoy. With Jacques you are sure to ENJOY an interesting sail and stories of wild blue yonder.

Rikarda Elsa

Bye bye Tanzania

Une forêt d’annexes et tous les amis a bord pour fêter le départ de Tanzanie.
Rhum de madagascar avec local juice mangue ou canne a sucre  …. j’en connais quelques uns qui ont du mal a retrouver leur bateau!
Merci a tous les amis que je laisse ici.

Bonne fenêtre météo pour 3-4 jours ,vent est – nord-est, inhabituel pour la saison , mais qui va me permettre de descendre plein sud , direction le Mozambique. Un courant assez fort, 1 a 2 nœuds me ralentis, mais sous spi, ENJOY avance quand même bien.

Après 3 jours, j’atteins le Nord du Mozambique , et passe la nuit au mouillage sous l’Île Quifuqui. Lendemain matin, je parcours les derniers 10 milles pour faire mon entrée officiel au Mozambique, dans le port de Mocimboa da Praia. A peine l’ancre jetée, 3 militaires armes de kalashnikov arrivent avec une prame motorisée et montent a bord.
Va falloir négocier … et effectivement après une fouille minutieuse du bateau, palabres je transige la police maritime a 14 dollars . une boite de lait et une boite de biscuit.
Je descend a terre, direction le bureau d’immigration qui ne dois pas voir plus de 2 voiliers par an !

Heureusement c’est une chef, les femmes étant moins corruptibles que les hommes. j’obtiens mon visa de 30 jours au tarif officiel de 50 dollars plus les frais d’assistenzia 30 dollars.

Je retrouve ENJOY après quelques péripéties avec l’annexe, et me prépare, en mouillant une 2eme ancre, pour un gros coup de vent de sud qui arrive le lendemain.

Vendredi 26 octobre, après 3 jours de coup de vent avec des rafales a 40 nœuds, je retrouve un peu de calme et les vas et viens des bus de mer qui desservent les petites îles aux alentours.

Mardi 30 octobre, ça y est une bonne météo pour 3 jours devrait me permettre de rejoindre facilement Ilha Moçambique , environ 250 milles au Sud.

Ilha Mocambique – Jeudi 1er novembre
Arrivée rock and roll : au moment ou je démarre le moteur pour embouquer le chenal , le câble d’embrayage lâche ! je manœuvre a la voile avec 20 nœuds de vent,  pour rejoindre le mouillage.
Immédiatement le captain of port arrive dans une petite barque, rendez vous est pris pour le lendemain.

Beaucoup de charme pour cette ancienne capitale de la colonie portugaise. Rencontre avec des expatriés portugais et leurs amis mozambicais, et une expédition dans la mangrove .. des concurrents pour le swim walk de Sibylle?

petits chevaux ilha mocambique

ilha mocambique mangrove

Ilha Bazaruto – vendredi 9 novembre
Apres 4 jours de mer, arrivée a la nuit tombée dans la belle bahia de Bazaruto.

bazarutoLe 3eme jour a été un peu rude, grand voile a 3 ris et trinquette a 60 pct, mer dure et courte provoquée par un vent contre courant, le fameux courant du mozambique qui deviendra le courant des aiguilles plus au sud.

J’attend une bonne météo pour continuer la descente au sud …

Maputo – Ilha  Inhaca – Samedi 17 novembre

Apres 2 jours et demi , je viens mouiller sous le phare d’Ilha Inhaca, a l’entrée de Maputo. 

Coup de vent de sud annonce; le bateau roule , le mouillage est inconfortable mais les fonds sont d’excellentes tenues.

2 jours de ce régime, et je change de mouillage pour aller a terre chercher du gas oil. C’est sommaire, mais équipé de mes bidons, je repars avec 40 litres …

Nouveau coup de vent de sud, je rejoins le mouillage au pied du phare, pour une attente de 2 jours jusqu’à vendredi ou j’ai une bonne météo qui doit me permettre de rejoindre Richards Bay en 24 h.

Richards Bay –  samedi 24 novembre

Ça y est, je suis le long du quai au Tuzigazi small craft , j’ai acheté du billtong,  je vais me régaler ….

C’est bon de faire une pause après presque 2000 milles en solitaire ….